Wednesday, March 17, 2010

A New First

I find it hard to believe that elementary school kids will get in fist fights at school or push each other up against the wall and punch them, but it happens.  I remember days like that in high school, and maybe just a tad few in middle school.  BUT NEVER in preschool.  

Today, we had a first at our house, well it actually happened at preschool.  When Geron went to pick the kids up today, a swarm up boys came running at him when he entered Cora's classroom.  They were trying to tell him that Cora had been in a fight with another child, a little boy.  (Mom, if you comment, don't mention names.)  While I'm not sure who started the fight, I do know that both parties have war injuries on their faces.  Theirs, apparently, was a scratching fight.  Cora's got an inch long scratch under her cheek which is presently covered with a Snow White band aid.  

After school, probably the whole way home, Cora and Daddy had a talk about the importance of not fighting, but being kind to friends even when they're not kind to us.  AND of the need to tell the teacher right away when someone hurts you instead of taking matters into your own hands.  Once home, we cleaned the wound with an antiseptic spray---quite painful for her.  Hopefully the remembrance of that spray will stop her from further fights in the future.  We then added neosporin and the snow white band aid, which seemed to make everything better.  

It was a little embarrassing having to explain at church tonight that the reason Cora had a band aid on her face was because she'd been in a fight at preschool.  I also feel a little guilty for finding it amusing in a way.  I took a picture for posterity---and future boyfriends.  This is one little lady not to mess with.

1 comments:

Mrs. Allroro said...

We teach our students to say "Please stop!" if somebody does something to them, and to then go and tell the teacher if they don't stop. We demonstrate how to say it with authority. Our kids really respect those words, even if they're coming from a tiny three year old. (And we have kids up to six years old in our class, too.)